Young Reacts #45

This week, I have 7 1:1s with strangers to talk about their careers and mine. I feel fortunate to have these opportunities to give and learn. Hopefully, some will evolve into long-term, mutually-beneficial relationships.

person holding piece of paper with phone a friend written text

Photo by Dustin Belt on Unsplash


People ❤️

Thriving on the Technical Leadership Path

I read quite a bit about and now have my own opinion of how to what makes a senior engineer. This article goes beyond and describes the next steps a senior engineer could follow.

Software Engineering 🌐

A product manager’s​ perspective on technical debt

You can think of tech debt as how you think of financial debt. Just as you would sometimes finance your investment via bank loans, you can pay for your product bets using the tech debt. It’s apt that the VP of Product at Capital One write this article.

dunglas/vulcain

A very cool project to leverage HTTP 2 features (multiplexing and server-push) to solve many problems GraphQL aims to solve: over/under fetching, and the n+1 problem. The project also reuses HTTP caching, which GraphQL can only use with predefined queries.

Pick your poison

Whatever architecture choices you make, GraphQL or REST, or Javascript or Typescript, remember that you will face unique challenges specific to you and your team.

Business 💸

The rise of the global first startup

I got two things that changed my thinking on remote work. First, Silicon Valley may have the best engineering talents, but the good ones are everywhere. Second, remote work is getting more accessible, thanks to the new tools. I hope to work in a completely remote environment to get better at remote work in the next few years.

State of Play: Six Trends Revolutionizing Games

I always thought games are the worst kind of software to develop due to a marketing-driven, fixed deadline, and the inability to verify ideas. But contemporary games work more like SaaS products, which could remove some of the pressure.

freeCodeCamp/chapter

Meetup users came out hard against the service’s plan to charge them, which was expected. But I am still surprised that the disgruntled users are now building open-source alternatives. This series of events shows how easy and cheap it is to start new services.

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